Dr. Stephen Flick

Stephen Flick heads Christian Heritage Fellowship, an organization dedicated to reclaiming America’s Christian Heritage and celebrating the life-changing influence of the Gospel around the world. Concerned with the cultural decay of America, Dr. Flick has sought to provide answers to fellow Christians (and unbelievers) concerning the questions and objections to Christianity often posed by secularists and the irreligious. Dr. Flick is a writer and speaker and has authored numerous articles and books on America’s Christian heritage. He earned his PhD from Drew University (Madison, NJ) in history and Christian theology and has taught at the graduate level as full professor. He is a licensed minster and resides in East Tennessee. He and his late wife, Beth Anne, have two grown, married children and six grandchildren.

Posts by Dr. Stephen Flick:

Holy Week—Christianity’s Most Sacred Season

Holy Week—Christianity’s Most Sacred Season

April, Christian Calendar, Christian Living, March, Schedule Post

Within Christianity, Holy Week commemorates the suffering and death of Jesus Christ. Among English-speaking communions, the expression Passion Week is also used to describe the same period of time—the Sunday before Christ’s Crucifixion to His Resurrection. One of the earliest designations for this week in the Early Church was the “Great Week,” and during the medieval...Read more... Read more...

Button Gwinnett

Button Gwinnett

American Christianity, Christian Calendar, Christian History, May Articles, Signers of Declaration of Independence

Button Gwinnett (1735 – May 19 or 27, 1777) was an British-born American political leader who, as a representative of Georgia to the Continental Congress, was the second of the signatories (first signature on the left) on the United States Declaration of Independence. He was also, briefly, the provisional president of Georgia in 1777, and Gwinnett County (now a major suburb of...Read more... Read more...

March 20, 1781: Seventh Congressional Fasting Proclamation

March 20, 1781: Seventh Congressional Fasting Proclamation

American Christianity

March 20, 1781 Congress issues seventh fasting proclamation There is no historical evidence to support the myth that America’s Founding Fathers were Deists or irreligious. Rather, just the opposite is true. Not only is the historical record replete with the Christian character of the English colonies that gave birth to America, but from the beginning of America as an independent...Read more... Read more...

March 20, 1779: Fifth Congressional Fasting Proclamation

March 20, 1779: Fifth Congressional Fasting Proclamation

American Christianity, Christian Calendar, Christian History, March Articles

Welcome, and thank you for choosing to listen.  Christian Heritage Fellowship is a listener supported organization, dedicated to reclaiming America's Christian Heritage and celebrating the life-changing influence of the Gospel around the world. Our organization remains committed to this purpose through the faithful giving of our friends and ministry family.  If you can help us...Read more... Read more...

March 19, 1782: Eighth Congressional Fasting Proclamation

March 19, 1782: Eighth Congressional Fasting Proclamation

American Christianity

March 19, 1782 Congress issues eighth fasting proclamation to states Far from pushing Christianity and religious observance from the life of government, the Continental Congress (and subsequent Confederation Congress) endorsed and encouraged Christian observances such as fasting, prayer, and thanksgiving. No single denomination or church was permitted to dominate at the congressional...Read more... Read more...

Quote Cloud

"The doctrines of Jesus are simple, and tend all to the happiness of man."
– Thomas Jefferson
Writings of Jefferson, 15:383
"You do well to wish to learn our arts and ways of life, and above all, the religion of Jesus Christ. These will make you a greater and happier people than you are."
– George Washington
Writings of George Washington, 15:53-55
"The general principles, on which the [Founding] Fathers achieved independence, were the only principles in which, that beautiful assembly of young gentlemen could unite, and these principles only could be intended by them in their address... And what were these general principles? I answer, the general principles of Christianity..."
– John Adams
Diary and Autobiography, 3:233-34
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