Christian Living in March

In contemporary America and throughout the world, orthodox or biblical Christian principles and practices are under attack. Though this struggle is not new to the life of Christianity, it is new to many Christians who may be tempted to compromise or completely capitulate in matters of Christian belief and behavior. The Bible is replete with examples of those who compromised or capitulated in this way, but Jesus Christ has warned that only "he who stands firm to the end will be saved" (Matt. 10:22; 24:13; Revelation 2:26). In an age when many professing "Christians" are compromising with a secular world, true believers remain faithful to both the principles and practices that arise out of the Word of God. "Christian Living in March" seeks to inform and inspire believers to practice their faith. Click to read the entire article…Christian Living in MarchMany of the suggestions presented in our monthly "Christian Living" articles may be used by individuals, families, or within the context of local churches. These articles are designed to inform and inspire Christians to celebrate their Christian heritage and provide means of spiritual growth. Parents and grandparents may employ some or all of these suggestions in developing a family altar and cultivating a Christian home. Local church leaders will readily recognize suggestions that may be incorporated into the life of their respective congregations.Christian Living in MarchWhat is true of gardening is also true of every level of spiritual life: "What we will not labor to cultivate will soon be taken over by weeds." It is work to maintain the family altar; it is work to have a Christian home. It is also work to cultivate a godly church, and if we are unwilling to diligently labor to maintain a godly life, family, and church, weeds will soon strangle the spiritual life of each!Article ContentsMarch is the third month of the year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The equivalent of March in the Southern Hemisphere is September, and in the Northern Hemisphere, March 1st is the beginning of the meteorological spring.March receives its name from ancient Rome when it was the first month of the year and was called Martius, being derived from Mars or Ares, the Greek god of war. In Mediterranean Rome, March was the first month of spring and was regarded as the logical period to begin military campaigns.The name of this month, "March," and its pagan origin should cause ardent Christians to re-examine the application of their faith to every-day life. The Greeks and Romans did not hesitate to unite their pagan faith to every aspect of life–including the months of the year. As the Greeks and Romans sought to paganize all of life, let true believers seek to Christianize all aspects of personal, ecclesiastical, and social life. Such an effort is a true civilizing influence.The birthstones of March are bloodstone and aquamarine, both of which symbolize courage. The birth flower of the month is the daffodil.In addition to the highlights of this month that are discussed below, additional subjects of interest regarding our Christian heritage are presented online, where they are arranged according to dates of occurrence. The online calendar where these articles are arranged is under continual development with new articles appearing as they become available. By clicking the message box below, readers will navigate to the present month under consideration.Observance: Late winter or early spring; FebruaryThe Lord has promised that his Word would not return unto Him void or without influence. Though Scripture memorization should be a regular part of personal and family spiritual life, the local church should regularly encourage this effort. Families should be encouraged to continue the practice of biblical memorization in their devotional exercises. However, denominational and local churches should systematically identify times when the special emphasis is placed upon biblical memorization. Though children are frequently the objects of such efforts, adults should not be left out of the effort to make this a regular discipline. Too frequently adults fail to commit the Word of God to memory and are ill-equipped to address moral, spiritual, political, and other issues as they arise in day-to-day life.Resource for children and adult memorization: Scripture Memory FellowshipObservance: Begins first Sunday in SeptemberRobert Raikes is often credited with having started the Sunday School movement, but it was British Methodist Hannah Ball, a native of High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire, England, who was the first to initiate a Sunday school in 1769.Christian homes are provided with an example of the necessity of Christian education in the institution of the Sunday school in local churches. Most churches begin a new Sunday School year on the first Sunday in September which continues throughout the year on a quarterly basis (September, December, March, and June). Christian homes should recognize the need to establish the discipline of Christian education, allowing the Sunday school in the local church to remind Christian homes of this important discipline. Allow the beginning of September to remind you of the need to develop Christian education in your heart and home throughout the year, and develop a plan for Christian education for your home!Remembrance: Congressional Spiritual Proclamations in MarchAmong the thousands of documents and events that demonstrate America's Christian origin are the sixteen spiritual proclamations issues by Congress during the American Revolution. Following the pattern of fasting, praying, and offering of thanksgiving to God that was use in the New England Colonies, Congress asked the American states to fast and pray in the spring and offer prayer and thanksgiving in the fall of the year. States were asked to invite their citizens to cease their labors and observe the day as proscribed by Congress.The first of the sixteen spiritual proclamations was issued in late spring on June 7, 1775 and was a fasting and prayer proclamation. The sixteenth and last spiritual proclamation to be issued by Congress on August 3, 1784 was a thanksgiving proclamation.By far, the most spiritual proclamations to be issued by Congress in any single month was March. In all, six were issued by Congress in the month of March from 1776 to 1782 and are listed below:Proclamation #2 – March 16, 1776: Prayer and FastingProclamation #5 – March 7, 1778: Prayer and FastingProclamation #7 – March 20, 1779: Prayer and FastingProclamation #9 – March 11, 1780: Prayer and FastingProclamation #11 – March 20, 1781: Prayer and FastingProclamation #13 – March 19, 1782: Prayer and FastingObservance: On or before March 17St. Patrick was one of the greatest missionaries of the Christian Church. Captured as a young man, Patrick was taken to Ireland where he served his master by tending his swine. After several years, Patrick escaped his bonds of slavery and managed to find his way back home, which is present-day England. Before long, Patrick received a call to return to the land of his captors as a missionary of Christ. Obedient to the leading of God's Spirit, he returned to Ireland to conduct an exemplary ministry. As a result, the British Isles and mainland Europe were greatly influenced by the spiritual descendants of Patrick.As is true for many of the Apostles, Church history has failed to provide extensive details about many of the early Church's greatest heroes. St. Patrick is among those we wish we were provided with more details concerning his life and ministry, but what is known concerning him evokes deep admiration and respect. Because of the inclination in the human heart to make idols out of individuals and objects, there can be little doubt that God intentionally removed unnecessary obstacles to right worship, and, therefore, obscured detailed information concerning the Churches earliest and most notable leaders. What remains concerning Patrick, however, is sufficient to elicit admiration and encouragement for the contemporary believer.Observance: Bishop Thomas Ken passed away on March 19, 1711Though most Christians may not immediately recognize the name Thomas Ken, his Doxology is widely known and sung throughout Christendom. As a Christian and Anglican Bishop, Ken should also be remembered for his courageous moral stand against the immoral King Charles II. Where Christian leaders fail to take a stand for what is right, church and society greatly suffer under the withering onslaught of mediocrity and spiritual death. Bishop Ken died on March 19, 1711 in the midst of very humble circumstances because of his stand for Christ.Events Surrounding Christ's Triumphal EntryRemembrance: March 28 and followingThe year was 33 A.D., and Jerusalem was preparing to receive thousands of visitors that would throng the streets of the city to observe the Feast of Passover. According to the Western calendar, the events that led up to this observance began at the end of March and are summarized in the list below:March 28: Six days before the Feast of Passover, Jesus arrived in the village of Bethany, the hometown of Lazarus, whom he had a short time previously raised from the death. That evening, a dinner was prepared in honor of Jesus at the home of Simon the leper (Mark 14:3). Martha, sister of Lazarus, helped to serve the food, and Lazarus was among the dinner guests (John 12:2). Mary, the other sister of Lazarus, brought a jar of very expensive perfume from the essence of nard, imported from India, and anointed the feet of Jesus. You may read the entire account in the Gospel of John 12:1-8.March 29: Five days before the Feast of Passover, a large crowd of Jews discovered Jesus was at Bethany and came to see him and Lazarus, who Jesus had earlier raised from the dead. Because many began to place faith in Jesus, the Jewish religious leaders began to plot the death of both Jesus and Lazarus (John 12:9-11). March 30, The Triumphal Entry: Four days prior to the Feast of Passover, Jesus set out for Jerusalem, sending two of his disciples on ahead to locate a donkey for him to ride into the city. The disciples located the donkey and its colt, brought them to Jesus, and threw their garments over the colt for Jesus to ride (Matthew 21:2-7). Along rode down from the Mount of Olives, crowds spread their garments upon the ground and strewed the road with palm branches, shouting and praising the Lord, saying "Bless the King who comes in the name of the Lord!" Just as David had ridden into the city a little more than a millennium earlier (1 Kings 1:33-46), Jesus conducted this symbolic act to demonstrate that he was the greater son of David who would assume David's throne. Unlike Islam, Christianity is the fulfillment of prophecies recorded in the Older Testament, specifically the coming of the Messiah: More than five hundred years earlier God had revealed to the prophet Daniel that 483 years after the command to rebuild Jerusalem the Messiah would come (Daniel 9:25). King Artaxerxes of Persia gave the command to rebuild Jerusalem in the month of Nisan in the twentieth year of his reign (Nehemiah 2:1). The Jews did not use a solar calendar as we do today, and in biblical prophecies the years are composed of 360 days (Revelation 11:2, 3; 12:6; 13:5). The exact day of the month is not given, but if the command to rebuild Jerusalem was given on the first of Nisan, March 5, 444 B.C., it was 483 years of 360 days later to the day, March 30, A.D. 33, that Jesus formally entered the city as the Messiah. The prophecy likely was fulfilled to the day!Observance: Holy WeekTwo special services are offered for use during Holy Week–Service of the Cross and Tenebrae: A Service of Darkness. Though it is unlikely that both services would be used in any single year, they are presented below for the consideration of pastors and their congregations.The Service of the Cross may become a powerful Maundy Thursday or Good Friday tradition within your church. As members of the congregation enter the place of worship, they are given a worship folder with a square nail tethered to a piece of paper. The plan of salvation is artfully related through a series of reading. Then, worshippers are instructed to write on the paper any sin or sorrow which should be given to the Lord, and at the appointed time in the service, they are invited to drive their nails in a place of their choosing on the cross placed at the front of the sanctuary. This simple act is intended to express contrition and repentance for sin and a confidence that the cross of Christ was sufficient to bear the sins and sorrows of the entire world. The impression of hammers striking the nails is a very sobering one. Served with the elements of the Lord's Supper, this service will live long in the hearts of worshippers. The service, including communion, is about an hour in length.Observance: Holy WeekIn far too many churches, the frenetic personal schedules of many believers does not make allowance for participation in meaningful and symbolic dramatic presentations. This fact often robs the individual and congregation of some of the most important moments in personal and collective worship. One of the ways to reverse this trend and achieve a balance between personal schedules and meaningful drama in the church is through scripted dramatic presentations, and the Easter season provides opportunity that is seldom equaled and never excelled in the Church year.A Tenebrae Service is an attempt to dramatize the closing days of Christ's ministry on earth leading up to and including the events of Good Friday. This service begins in light, commemorating the significant events of Christ's movement toward the cross, and culminates in darkness expressive of the extinguishing of the physical life of the Messiah of the world, Jesus Christ. Few experiences bring the audience to the awareness of the spiritual realities of the Easter season.First week of March: No cussing/swearing week. See our article, 1789, March 2: Last session of the Continental Congress at Fraunces Tavern is adjourned sine die. Philip Pell of New York was the sole member in attendance1775, March 23: To avoid interference from Lieutenant-Governor Dunmore and his Royal Marines, the Second Virginia Convention met March 20, 1775 inland at Richmond--in what is now called St. John's Church--instead of the Capitol in Williamsburg. Delegate Patrick Henry presented resolutions to raise a militia, and to put Virginia in a posture of defense. Henry's opponents urged caution and patience until the crown replied to Congress' latest petition for reconciliation.1857, March: In March 1857, the Supreme Court issued its decision in Dred Scott versus Sandford. Chief Justice Roger B. Taney opined that blacks were not citizens, and derived no rights from the Constitution. Lincoln denounced the decision, alleging it was the product of a conspiracy of Democrats to support the Slave Power. Lincoln argued, "The authors of the Declaration of Independence never intended 'to say all were equal in color, size, intellect, moral developments, or social capacity', but they 'did consider all men created equal–equal in certain inalienable rights, among which are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness'."1861, March 4: Abraham Lincoln was sworn in as president. E. Michael Rusten and Sharon O. Rusten, The One Year Book of Christian History (Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2003), 181. Stanley Key, pastor of Loudonville Community Church, Loudonville, New York first shared this idea with the author. See their website: .Christian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Living in MarchChristian Heritage Fellowship FacebookChristian Heritage Fellowship FacebookChristian Heritage Fellowship FacebookPodcast: 'Christian Living in March,' by Dr. Stephen Flick. 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In contemporary America and throughout the world, orthodox or biblical Christian principles and practices are under attack. Though this struggle is not new to the life of Christianity, it is new to m

Christian Living in February

Emboldened secularism and irreligion threatens not only the Christian foundation of America, but more importantly threatens the spiritual life of believers and their churches. By denying the historical facts concerning the positive influence of Christianity, atheism, agnosticism, and various forms of irreligion seek to rob Christianity of its global influence. As a result, these forms of irreligion and other world religions claim for themselves the advances in society around the world made primarily by Christianity. "Christian Living in February" seeks to identify important Christian principles and practices common to February that inform and inspire Christians to celebrate their Christian heritage. Click to read this entire article…Many of the suggestions presented in our monthly "Christian Living" articles may be used by individuals, families, or within the context of local churches. These articles are designed to inform and inspire Christians to celebrate their Christian heritage and provide means of spiritual growth. Parents and grandparents may employ some or all of these suggestions in developing a family altar and cultivating a Christian home. Local church leaders will readily recognize suggestions that may be incorporated into the life of their respective congregations.Christian Living in FebruaryWhat is true of gardening is also true of every level of spiritual life: "What we will not labor to cultivate will soon be taken over by weeds." It is work to maintain the family altar; it is work to have a Christian home. It is also work to cultivate a godly church, and if we are unwilling to diligently labor to maintain a godly life, family, and church, weeds will soon strangle the spiritual life of each!Christian Living in FebruaryWhile the winter months pose a challenge to a variety of outdoor activities, many enjoyable opportunities remain within the reach of the family and local church. Some emphasis should be placed upon the circulation of Christian books, periodicals, and other materials. In addition, emphasis should also be placed upon Bible memorization and the means to accomplish it. In fact, the Christian family and church may formally stress Christian reading and Bible memorization a couple times a year. Regular emphasis on each is important to the spiritual development of the Christian family and local church. In addition, February is often a time to begin to prepare for the Lenten and Easter seasons and related activities and events that may occur about the same season.Table of ContentsThe calendar used in the West is the result of extended evolution. For the most part, our calendar is the result of the influence of the Greeks and the Romans who followed them. February receives its name from Februa (or Februatio), an ancient purification festival held on February 15 (full moon) under the old lunar Roman calendar. The Roman god Februus received his name from this festival rather than giving his name to it. The festival was observed annually by the pagan Romans to allegedly cleanse buildings and purge the lives of people at a time when new life began to spring from the earth.February is the second month of the Julian and Gregorian calendars and is the shortest month of the year, composed of fewer than thirty days. Normally, February has only twenty-eight days, but on leap years receives one more. In the Northern Hemisphere, February is the third month of winter, but in the Southern Hemisphere it is the seasonal equivalence of August.The birth flowers of February are the violet and common primrose, and amethyst—which symbolizes piety, humility, spiritual wisdom, and sincerity—is the birthstone of the month.In addition to the highlights of this month that are discussed below, additional subjects of interest regarding our Christian heritage are presented online, where they are arranged according to dates of occurrence. The online calendar where these articles are arranged is under continual development with new articles appearing as they become available. By clicking the message box below, readers will navigate to the present month under consideration.Observance: The month of FebruarySecular influences have designated February as Black History Month. This designation offers optimal opportunity to investigate the true history of slavery and America's Founding Fathers' attitude toward this institution.Slavery has been a cudgel used by Darwinists, Marxists, and anti-American forces to discredit America's Founding Fathers and the legitimacy of American government in general. However, when the facts are known, American leaders waged a cold war against slavery long before sentiments boiled over into America's Civil War (1861-1865). A number of facts related to slavery in America will set the record straight:The global context of slavery. Contrary to the charge of liberal or Marxist Democrats—such as Democratic Virginia Senator Tim Kaine —slavery did not start in America. Rather, from the earliest pages of human history, slavery existed. In fact, there are more individuals enslaved today than has ever been held at any period in human history. Christians End Indian Slavery. Prior to the arrival of Columbus in the Americas, Indians enslaved fellow Indians. In fact, Columbus found that some Indians cannibalized other Indians. Bartolome de las Casas, a Spanish Catholic Dominican friar and priest successfully advocated for the ending of Indian enslavement. On November 20, 1542, the emperor signed the New Laws abolishing the encomiendas that enslaved Indians in Spanish American territories. It may be noted that Indians held black slave even following the American Civil War.Early White and Black Enslavement. The earliest form of servitude in the American English colonies was the white indentured servant. Often whites who wished to migrate to America and could not afford to pay for their passage to the New World bound themselves to a period of servitude to those willing to pay their travel fees. Those binding themselves to serve—usually for seven years—were known as indentured servants. In 1619 when blacks were first brought to America, they were treated—just like whites—as indentured servants and eventually released from servitude.How Permanent Slavery Began. Contrary to the assertion of the those behind the 1619 Project, permanent slavery did not begin in Jamestown, Virginia in 1619. Permanent slavery in the American English colonies began decades later, and the first man to enslave blacks in America was a black man by the name of Anthony Johnson.The First Anti-Slavery Society. After thousands of years, slavery was called into question by Christian nations where the Bible received prominent attention over the opinions of Church leaders. The Protestant Reformation with its emphasis upon Scripture gave rise to biblical morality and the rejection of slavery.The Founders Resist Slavery. Many facts can be presented to demonstrate that America's Founding Fathers resisted slavery. At the federal level, Founding Fathers are on record resisting the slave trade from the First Continental Congress. On October 20, 1774, the First Continental Congress drafted a list of resolves to be sent to King George; among them was the following: "We will neither import nor purchase, any slave imported after the first day of December next." Democrats and Slavery. In the South, the Democratic Party arose as the champion of slavery. The racism of the Democratic Party has been recounted in great detail by David Barton in Setting the Record Straight: American History in Black & White. Observance: February or soon afterTragically, churches and their leaders sense no obligation to inform the members of their congregations of quality Christian materials. As a result, the church library—if one exists—is greatly overlooked and neglected. But the month of February is a good opportunity to call attention to the importance of good Christian literature and audio and video resources. The Honorable Daniel Webster was one of the greatest orators and political figures America has conceived. As an earnest Christian, Webster understood the importance of perpetuating the Christian faith through good education and Christian literature. On one occasion, he addressed the matter succinctly:If religious books are not widely circulated among the masses in this country, I do not know what is going to become of us as a nation. If truth be not diffused, then error will be. If God and His Word are not known and received, the devil and his works will gain the ascendency. If the evangelical volume does not reach every hamlet, the pages of a corrupt and licentious literature will. If the power of the gospel is not felt throughout the length and breadth of this land, anarchy and misrule, degradation and misery, corruption and darkness will reign without mitigation or end.Because we are forgetful, we need reminders to do those things that are most beneficial to us. Sometimes reminders of good eating habits or good health practices are welcomed promptings of what we should be doing. When living in a dark world, it is easy—in the natural or carnal self—to allow ourselves to become accustomed to the darkness, but God calls Christians to shine the light of His truth upon our world. To accomplish this, we must see have the light before we are capable of sharing the light, and outstanding Christian reading material help us to both see and share.See our article: Twelve Books Every Christian Should ReadObservance: Late winter or early spring; FebruaryThe Lord has promised that his Word would not return unto Him void or without influence. Though Scripture memorization should be a regular part of personal and family spiritual life, the local church should regularly encourage this effort. Families should be encouraged to continue the practice of biblical memorization in their devotional exercises. However, denominational and local churches should systematically identify times when the special emphasis is placed upon biblical memorization. Though children are frequently the objects of such efforts, adults should not be left out of the effort to make this a regular discipline. Too frequently adults fail to commit the Word of God to memory and are ill-equipped to address moral, spiritual, political, and other issues as they arise in day-to-day life.Resource for children and adult memorization: Scripture Memory FellowshipObservance: First Sunday in FebruaryThe first Sunday in February is National Lord's Day Observance Sunday. The sponsoring organization is The Lord's Day Alliance of the United States (LDA), an organization composed of representatives from various denominations throughout America. The LDA was founded in 1888 when representatives of six major Protestant denominations met in Washington, D.C. to organize the American Sabbath Union; this name was later changed to The Lord’s Day Alliance of the United States. While contemporary evangelicalism is increasingly indifferent toward the observance of the Lord’s Day, it has been the focus of considerable interest in great revivals throughout the history of the Christian Church. Even the eighteenth-century enemy of Christ, Voltaire, understood there was no hope of destroying Christianity as long as the observance of the Lord’s Day stood: “There is no hope of destroying Christianity so long as the Christian Sabbath is acknowledged as a sacred day.”See more information about the Lord’s Day AllianceObservance: On or before February 12Darwin Day was instituted by the admirers of Charles Darwin as a memorial of Darwin's birth, February 12, 1809, and a celebration of his efforts in science. The work that has most characterized the life of Darwin was his book, Origin of Species, published in 1859. Since Darwin's death on April 19, 1882 at the age of 73, sporadic efforts have been made to remember Darwin's efforts. Such attempts to remember Darwin by his admirers are enthusiastic endeavors to ensure that their nonscientific theory of evolution continue to enjoy support by a credulous public that continues to lend support for that which finds no scientific evidence!In 1909, more that 400 scientists and dignitaries from 167 countries gathered at Cambridge, England to remember Darwin and advance the cause of evolution. Such institutions as the New York Academy of Sciences, the American Museum of Natural History, the Royal Society of New Zealand, the University of Chicago, and many others have advocated Darwin as a defender of scientific truth, rather than what he was—a theorist of a world view without obligation to a Creator.Plans for an annual observance of Darwin were devised by The Humanist Community of Palo Alto, California in late 1993 and motivated by Dr. Robert Stephens. Their first Darwin Day event was sponsored by the Stanford Humanists student group and a group known as the Humanist Community, on April 22, 1995. Since then, The Humanist Community has continued an annual observance of February 12. Since these initial efforts, Darwin Day has gained popularity and much greater organization throughout America.In his book, Seven Men Who Rule the World from the Grave, Dave Breese, discusses Darwin's devastating influence upon the world. One reason death and destruction has prevailed upon the world to the degree it has is because of any obligation to a Creator and Ruler. Darwinism has become the intellectual crutch of atheism and agnosticism. If Christianity is to influence the world for good, denominations, pastors, and local churches must be vigorous in their attack against the hoax of Darwinism!One of the many influences of the Christian faith upon culture is seen in the holidays that are observed by society. Along with St. Nicholas, St. Valentine has become regarded as a patron saint of love. Like St. Nicholas, the life and ministry of St. Valentine are not well known, and as a result have become employed in purposes that have been neither Christian nor spiritual. As is true for the ministry of early Church leaders, it is often difficult to distinguish hagiolatry from fact.When studying the lives of early Christians, accurate sources are often lacking—as is the case with the life of St. Valentine. What makes such studies even more difficult is the intermingling of fact with fiction, and understanding the reasoning behind such efforts is very significant.Some early Christians embellished the lives of other prominent Christians in an attempt to demonstrate that Christianity was superior to paganism and all other religions. It was common among pagans to attribute god-like qualities to their prominent leaders, particularly after their deaths. As a result, pagans deified their dead and treated them as gods by praying to them, offering them sacrifices, burning incense to them, and proffering other acts of worship. Lamentably, Christians followed these pagan practices and, in this way, corrupted biblical Christianity.Observance: Third Monday of FebruaryFrom the latter half of the twentieth century, the American courts have repeatedly attacked the Christian foundation which birthed America. The real hope of America is a spiritual awakening which restores the evangelical principles of Scripture to both the church and state. Just as the pastors laid the foundation for the American Revolution by denouncing the tyrannical rule of King George III, pastors must once again articulate the biblical principles of civil government. American history is replete with examples of the influence of evangelical Christianity upon the formation of America as an independent nation. Pastors must be more proactive in advocating the place that Christianity once held in America and the place it must again hold.One way pastors may promote the role of the church in society is through the observance of national historical events. February provides the pastor and local church with the opportunity to celebrate the lives of America’s leaders through the observance of President’s Day. One of several ways to remind parishioners of the role that Christianity must have upon America is by reading a prayer of one of the presidents in a worship service—perhaps prior to the congregational or pastoral prayer.See our article: George Washington's Prayer at Valley ForgeObservance: Sunday before Ash Wednesday or on Ash WednesdayWithin many Christian traditions, it is often customary to emphasize missions during the period of Lent. This period in Christian history has been observed as a period of sacrifice, reminding us of the great sacrifice of our Lord Jesus Christ. Roman Catholics have been called upon for generations to sacrificially observe this season in the life of the church. Protestants too may be invited to sacrifice for the sake of the advancement of the gospel by giving sacrificially to missions within the local church and local community.Observance: Holy WeekTwo special services are offered for use during Holy Week–Service of the Cross and Tenebrae: A Service of Darkness. Though it is unlikely that both services would be used in any single year, they are presented below for the consideration of pastors and their congregations.The Service of the Cross may become a powerful Maundy Thursday or Good Friday tradition within your church. As members of the congregation enter the place of worship, they are given a worship folder with a square nail tethered to a piece of paper. The plan of salvation is artfully related through a series of reading. Then, worshippers are instructed to write on the paper any sin or sorrow which should be given to the Lord, and at the appointed time in the service, they are invited to drive their nails in a place of their choosing on the cross placed at the front of the sanctuary. This simple act is intended to express contrition and repentance for sin and a confidence that the cross of Christ was sufficient to bear the sins and sorrows of the entire world. The impression of hammers striking the nails is a very sobering one. Served with the elements of the Lord's Supper, this service will live long in the hearts of worshippers. The service, including communion, is about an hour in length.Observance: Special emphasis throughout FebruaryOne of the most remarkable displays of Christian love for one's enemies was offered to the world by the Anabaptist, Dirk Willems. The Anabaptist tradition arose along side the Reformed Calvinistic tradition at the time of Ulrich Zwingli in Switzerland. Eventually their convictions estranged them to other Protestants. Many Evangelical traditions today have been deeply influenced by this wing of the Protestant tradition.One unique practice of the Anabaptist tradition was re-baptizing those who came to accept Anabaptist theology. Born in Asperen, Gelderland, Netherlands, Dirk Willems rejected the practice of infant baptism observed by the Roman Catholics and the established Protestants of the Magisterial Reformation and accepted believer's baptism. Because of his adherence to Anabaptist principles and practices, Willems was arrested by the Roman Catholic Church in the Netherlands. He was imprisoned in a residential palace that had been turned into a prison, but escaped using a rope composed of knotted rags. From a window, Willems lowered himself onto the ice of the moat that surrounded the palace, but an alert guard noticed his escape and gave chase. Willems, having lived on prison rations for some time, was able to cross the ice, but his purser was less fortunate and broke through. Hearing the guard's screams for help from the icy water, Willems turned back to aid and rescue his pursuer. He was again taken into custody, tried and convicted, and burned at the stake near his hometown on May 16, 1569.Navigate to print of Dirk Willems at Scroll Publishing...February 1692 to May 1693: The Salem witch trials were a series of hearings and prosecutions of individuals accused of witchcraft in colonial Massachusetts from February 1692 to May 1693. The proceedings resulted in the executions of twenty people, most of whom were women. The majority of pastors in New England were against these trials, with only three known to have supported them—one of whose daughter and niece initiated the excitement in Salem. Well-known minister, Cotton Mather, was vigorously opposed to the trials and was instrumental in bringing them to a conclusion.February 3, 1924: Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 - February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States, in office from 1913 to 1921. A leader of the Progressive Movement, he served as President of Princeton University from 1902 to 1910, and then as the Governor of New Jersey from 1911 to 1913. With the Republican Party split in 1912, he led his Democratic Party to control both the White House and Congress for the first time in nearly two decades.February 9, 1881: Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky (11 November 1821 - 9 February 1881), sometimes transliterated Dostoevsky, was a Russian novelist, short story writer, essayist and philosopher. Well-known as the author of the expression, "If there is no God, everything is permissible."February 12, 1809: Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 - April 15, 1865) was the 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865.February 12, 1915: Frances Jane van Alstyne, née Crosby (March 24, 1820 - February 12, 1915), more commonly known as Fanny Crosby, was an American mission worker, poet, lyricist, and composer. A lifelong Methodist, she was one of the most prolific hymnists in history, writing over 8,000 hymns and gospel songs, with over 100 million copies printed. This is despite her being blind from shortly after birth. Crosby is also known for her preaching, teaching, and her rescue mission work. By the end of the 19th century, she was "a household name".February 14, 1780: Sir William Blackstone (10 July 1723 - 14 February 1780) was an English jurist, judge and Tory politician of the eighteenth century. He is most noted for writing the Commentaries on the Laws of England. Blackstone's understanding of the role of Christianity in law was one of the most formative influences in American government.February 29, 1960: Thomas O. Chisholm was born in Franklin, Kentucky on July 29, 1866 in a log cabin and became a teacher at age sixteen. Chisholm had a Christian conversion experience at age twenty-seven during a revival in Franklin led by Dr. Henry Clay Morrison. Chisholm served as a Methodist minister for one-year before resigning due to poor health. Chisholm wrote over 1,200 sacred poems over his lifetime, which appeared in many Christian periodicals, and he served as an editor of the Pentecostal Herald in Louisville for a period. He died in Ocean Grove, New Jersey on February 29, 1960. The Latin term februum, means "scrabble". Anthony Leonardi "Sen. Tim Kaine Claimed That the United States Created the Institution of Slavery," Washington Examiner, January 18, 2023; https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/tim-kaine-the-united-states-created-slavery. See W. O. Blake, The History of Slavery and the Slave Trade, Ancient and Modern (Columbus, OH: H. Miller, 1860). Washington Irving, A History of the Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus, 4 vols. (London: John Murray, 1828), 2:15. Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, 34 vols. (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1904-1937), 1:76-77. David Barton, Setting the Record Straight: American History in Black & White (Aledo, TX: WallBuilders, 2004). See our article: A History of the Lord's Day in America. Since Darwin's theory of evolution completely lacks scientific support, the expression "contribution" is not used here. The theory of evolution, as admitted by Darwin himself in Origin of Species (1859), has not enjoyed scientific support, but, like many errors, it has raced around the world before truth has had an opportunity to put on its boots. In 1972 Stephen Jay Gould and Niles Eldredge developed another theory of evolution called punctuated equilibrium, which suggested that evolution did not occur over a long period of time, but rather over a very short period of time. Both forms of evolution have no scientific support! Gould's and Eldredge's form of evolution is a confession that there is not support for gradual evolution, but tragically, Gould and Eldredge do not bother to provide any evidence for their theory either. Veneration or worship of Christian saints. See John Woodbridge, More Than Conquerors: Portraits of Believers from All Walks of Life. See John Woodbridge, More Than Conquerors: Portraits of Believers from All Walks of Life. See John Woodbridge, More Than Conquerors: Portraits of Believers from All Walks of Life. See John Woodbridge, More Than Conquerors: Portraits of Believers from All Walks of Life.Christian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Living in FebruaryChristian Heritage Fellowship FacebookChristian Heritage Fellowship FacebookChristian Heritage Fellowship FacebookInternalLinkInternalLinkInternalLinkInternalLinkInternalLinkInternalLink

Emboldened secularism and irreligion threatens not only the Christian foundation of America, but more importantly threatens the spiritual life of believers and their churches. By denying the historic

Christian Living in January

Whereas the end of each year is usually focused upon Thanksgiving, Christmas, and end-of-year activities, January offers a much-appreciated respite from the demands that often accompany these important celebratory events. While most of us are still accountable to the demands of every-day life as the New Year begins, this season of the year may be employed to establish the tone of the entire year. Casting an eye upon the year that is behind us should deepen the resolve of the true follower of Christ to follow more closely to the Master. If other resolutions are all laid aside, the resolve to more earnestly follow Christ must never be. Employing all the means of grace that God provides, let us venture forth to place our footprints upon the unsullied year before us.JanuaryAs we enter a new month and new year, we remember that before us are a number of opportunities to deepen our appreciation for the ways God has used the lives of other believers in previous generations. As Christians, we should be growing in the grace that God grants to each of us as well as celebrating what He has already done through the lives of others to bequeath to us a glorious Christian heritage.Table of ContentsThe month of January takes its name from Janus, the mythological Roman god of beginnings and transitions. The original Roman calendar consisted of ten months, but around 713 BC, the semi-mythical King Numa Pompilius is alleged to have added the months of January and February which took into consideration the 354 days of the lunar year. Under the old Roman calendar, March was originally the first month of the year but was displaced by January and February under Numa Pompilius or perhaps under Decemvirs about 450 BC—on the era or date of transition, Roman historians differ.January is the first month of the year in the Gregorian and Julian calendars and is the first of seven months whose length is thirty-one days. In the Northern Hemisphere, January is the second month of winter and, on average, is the coldest month of the year. In the Southern Hemisphere, January is the second month of summer and is equivalent to July in the Northern Hemisphere.The birthstone of January is the garnet (which represents constancy), and the birth flower is the Pink Dianthus. The full moon which occurs in January is known as the "Wolf Moon".The following rhyme is a time-honored attempt to remember the number of days in each month of the year:Thirty days hath SeptemberApril, June, and NovemberAll the rest have thirty-oneExcept for February aloneWhich has twenty-eight days clearAnd twenty-nine in each leap yearIn addition to the highlights of this month that are discussed below, additional subjects of interest regarding our Christian heritage are presented online, where they are arranged according to dates of occurrence—with particular attention being given to the influence Christianity has exercised upon the origin of America. The online calendar where these articles are arranged is under continual development with new articles appearing as they become available. By clicking the message box below, readers will navigate to the present month under consideration. Many of America's Founding Fathers read the Bible through each year. For them, the Bible was a means of direction for their personal lives and the life of the nation. Contrary to the popular notion pushed on American that her Founding Fathers were secular, overwhelmingly they were Christians. A study of the Journals of Congress or minutes of Congress reveals that Founding Fathers endorsed the Christian religion and its practices—though no single denomination was endorsed. In the middle of the nineteenth century, the judiciary committees of both the House of Representatives and the Senate defended America's Christian heritage. The House recognized that nearly all American colonies had state sanctioned churches. However, Founding Fathers did not allow for a federal or national church.Few are aware that many of America's Founding Fathers were founders of Bible societies. In fact, Elias Boudinot was a distinguished Founding Father who served as a president of Congress (from Nov. 4, 1782–Nov. 3, 1783), was a member of the American spy network during the Revolution, and held prominent positions in government following the War of Independence. Like many other Founding Fathers, Boudinot promoted Bible societies and served as the first president of the American Bible Society. He was followed in that office by John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.The idea that the people of a nation were the primary foundation of government is known as "republicanism," and Founding Fathers such as Noah Webster understood that the Bible provided the foundation for republicanism:The brief exposition of the constitution of the United States, will unfold to young persons the principles of republican government; and it is the sincere desire of the writer that our citizens should early understand that the genuine source of correct republican principles is the Bible, particularly the New Testament or the Christian religion.As the new year begins, Christians should give careful consideration to designated personal times of prayer and Bible reading. To assist in these personal disciplines, suggested resources are offered below:On January 10, 1776, Thomas Paine anonymously published his work, Common Sense. Paine wrote and reasoned in a style that common people understood. Forgoing the philosophical and Latin references used by Enlightenment era writers, he structured Common Sense as if it were a sermon, and relied on biblical references to make his case to the people. Paine intended to name the work Plain Truth but his good friend, Dr. Benjamin Rush, suggested Common Sense. The primary intent of this work was to move the American colonies toward national independence from Great Britain.In July and August of 1776, the Continental Congress declared independence from Great Britain when the President of the Congress, John Hancock, and the members of Congress signed the Declaration of Independence. What is universally overlooked by secularists who deny the Christian origin of America is the fact that the members of the Continental Congress established American law upon the "laws of Nature and Nature's God." As Englishmen, they did not establish American law upon the rights of Englishmen granted to them in the Magna Carta or any other document that granted liberty to Englishmen. Rather, when the Continental Congress laid a foundation for American law, it appealed to a foundation that the members of Congress believed was universal, to be enjoyed by all people everywhere: "to Nature and Nature's God"! Thomas Jefferson, being the primary author of the Declaration, followed the clear theological teaching of the day that stressed the revelation of God in nature as well as the revelation of God in Scripture. In establishing American law upon the "laws of Nature and Nature's God," Jefferson was reflecting an important doctrine of historic Christian theology which was advocated by his pastor.Suggested observance: First weeks of January, May, and SeptemberThough a regular prayer life is encouraged within individual believers and their families, and weekly prayer and fasting is encouraged in the church, a periodic seasonal effort may be undertaken to sustain and further develop spiritual vitality. It was the custom of the Church in Early America (and the Continental and Congressional Congresses) to call for days of “public humiliation, fasting and prayer.” To nurture a spirit of dependence upon the Lord, several seasons of prayer and fasting may be established in the calendar year. In the American Church, the first week in January (after the Christmas holidays and the beginning of the year), the first week in May (which may include the last weekend in April and the week of National Day of Prayer), and the last week of August (the beginning of the new Sunday School year) provide good opportunities to call individual believers, the family, and the church to prayer. During these weeks, members of the local church are invited to select at least one day (and more if possible) of the designated week for these spiritual disciplines.Observance: Early in JanuaryAs the new year begins, the Christian home and church may wish to observe two special worship opportunities. If they are observed in the church, perhaps the first two Sunday evenings (or Wednesday evenings) in January may best be used for these opportunities. It is suggested that the Service of Praise (first Sunday evening) be conducted prior to the Service of Reflection (second Sunday evening). If an Advent wreath is used in the home or church during Advent season, the Christ candle may be used in this service one last time. Since the Christ candle is a prominent element in this first worship opportunity, the candle should be selected with care. Not only is the Christ Candle significant to the Advent wreath, but it is also the most significant elements in this service of praise.Observance: Early in JanuaryIt is easy to overlook the many blessings of the preceding year. To stimulate the Israelites to praise and thanksgiving, the Lord interweaved worship elements into the life of His chosen people. Often, significant moments and individuals whom the Lord has used to bless our lives are soon forgotten unless careful attention and deliberate efforts are made to acknowledge them and accord them the proper place of affection they deserve. The previous year has been but one strand in the larger tapestry of life, but the grace that God has manifested in our lives deserves special recognition and just appreciation. The intension of such a gathering in the home or service in the church is not to gloat over personal or collective achievements, but rather to celebrate God’s abundant and abiding grace.Observance: On or before January 22; occasionally following this dateSince the legalization of abortion in America on January 22, 1973, millions of women and men have been deceived concerning the sanctity of human life within the womb. Though the pro-life moment has gained cultural and moral ground since the infamous day that the United States Supreme Court legalized abortion, there is still much that needs done. Though many believers do not worship in churches that have specific ministries toward the unborn, individual Christians and congregations may join efforts with like-minded groups who have dedicated themselves to the elimination of legalized abortion and the consolation of the suffering. The sanctity of human life should be celebrated from the womb to the tomb. Sanctity of Human Life observances may annually be convened on January 22, but observances may often precede or follow this date.Observance: On or before January 24Have you ever seen a car license plate from the state of Connecticut? If you have, do you remember the slogan emblazoned on it? Connecticut is called the "Constitution State," but very few of us know why it has been given this title.The reason Connecticut is called the Constitution State is because of a Christian minister and his belief that the Bible contains all of the principles necessary for happy contented living—including the Christian's involvement in matters of government or politics. The pastor's name was Thomas Hooker. He was born on July 7, 1586 in Marfield, England. Educated within the Puritan tradition at the University of Cambridge, Hooker became a lecturer at Emmanuel College, and after being persecuted for his evangelical Puritan beliefs, decided to settle in New England. There he assumed the pastorate of the church in Newton, Massachusetts (present-day Cambridge). It may be noted that Hooker was acquainted with John Eliot, "Apostle to the American Indian," and John Cotton, "Father of New England Congregationalism."In January of 1639,

Whereas the end of each year is usually focused upon Thanksgiving, Christmas, and end-of-year activities, January offers a much-appreciated respite from the demands that often accompany these importan

Christian Living in December

Often, the Christmas season is the most meaningful time of year—for both the believer and unbeliever. Many fail to use this season of the year to point to Christ as fully as they might to Christianize the world around them. While some attempt to sanctify the carnal and merely sensuous for Christian purposes, the Apostle Paul warns believers to build with materials that are most precious and most enduring (1 Corinthians 3:10-18). For this reason, Christian leaders should look eagerly upon the Christmas season with the intent to redeem every opportunity presented to them.As Christians anticipate the celebration of the birth of Christ, a couple of important biblical truths should influence the way in which we celebrate. By giving these important doctrines emphasis at this time of year, it is hoped that they will maintain an important place in our thinking throughout the year:The necessity of an atonement for sin—If the advent of sin into the world and its influences are not well understood, the world will not understand the purpose of the Advent of Christ, nor will they understand the need for salvation by a living faith in Christ.The Advent of Jesus—The Virgin Birth, the humanity of Christ, and his deity should be prevalent during the Christmas season.As the calendar year draws to an end, many opportunities for meaningful ministry exist. In America, Christians should make every effort to capitalize on the Christian heritage bequeathed to the nation by our forefathers. Parents, pastors, and local church leaders should not allow important historical and spiritual events to lapse without celebrating them within the church as well as advocating them in the community.ContentsIn addition to the highlights of this month that are discussed below, additional subjects of interest regarding our Christian heritage are presented online, where they are arranged according to dates of occurrence—with particular attention being given to the influence Christianity has exercised upon the origin of America. The online calendar where these articles are arranged is under continual development with new articles appearing as they become available. By clicking the message box below, readers will navigate to the present month under consideration. In the Julian and Gregorian Calendars, December is the twelfth month of the year. The last four months of our year, September, October, November and December, all receive their names from Latin numerical terms. Prior to the introduction of January and February into our calendar system, the old Roman calendar employed a calendar of only ten months. Latin numbers were given to these months: septem, (meaning seven) became September; octem, (eight) became October; novem (nine) became November; decem (ten) became December. When January and February were added to the ten-month calendar to become our twelve-month calendar, these latter four months retained their Latin names, despite their new positions as months nine, ten, eleven, and twelve.In the Northern Hemisphere, the meteorological winter begins on December 1, and it is the month with the shortest daylight hours. It is also the equivalent to June in the Southern Hemisphere where December 1 is the beginning of the meteorological summer and where the longest days of the year are experienced.Birthstones for the month of December include turquoise, zircon and tanzanite; the birth flower is the narcissus, a genus of predominantly spring flowering perennials of the amaryllis family, including daffodil, narcissus, and jonquil—which describe all or some members of the genus.Observance: December 4America's Christian heritage has been written in both large, bold, declarative statements as well as faint ornamental affirmations. To the degree that secularists and their supporters are successful in concealing the truth, to that degree America will walk in the darkness brought upon it and every nation where irreligion has ascended to tyrannical dominance. One of the many ways that America's Founding Fathers declared their intentions was not only through the principles they articulated in their writings, but the practices they observed, and few practices are as straightforward as the way they worshipped. If it may be demonstrated that their worship was Christian and that they intended that this worship should not be excluded from the recognition and appreciation of the government, the fraudulent claims of secularism are completely denied, and therefore, must be denounced by an accurately informed people. The misinformation and fraudulent claims of secularism against America's Christian heritage suffer a grievous blow when we realize that America's Founding Fathers established a church within the United States Capitol before its construction was complete, and the Capitol continued to be used as a Church until after the Civil War.A church had been meeting in the United States Capitol for more than five years before Congress officially occupied the Capitol. The first session of both houses of Congress at the Capitol began on November 17, 1800. During the first few weeks, committee room assignments and other designations for the use of the Capitol were made.It was during this period of allotting rooms and space throughout the Capitol, that the larger chamber of the House of Representatives was officially designated as the place where church services would be held. With no debate, the House of Representatives—by consensus—made provision for the use of their chamber for Christian worship services. No other building at that time in Washington was sufficient to accommodate the large crowd that attended worship at the Capitol, and the chamber of the House of Representatives was the largest room in the Capitol. The Annals of Congress records the ease with which Christian worship was officially sanctioned in the Capitol. On Thursday, December 4, 1800, a brief entry was made in this official record of the House of Representatives which read:The Speaker informed the House that the Chaplains had proposed, if agreeable to the House, to hold Divine service every Sunday in their Chamber.Observance: On or before December 6Early in the life of the Christian Church, believers began to engraft a pagan practice into the life of Christianity. That practice was the worship of the dead. Pagans had long practiced praying to loved ones and tribal heroes who were deceased, often placing objects of affection and veneration at their burial sites, and in time, the practices of ancestor and hero worship made their way into second- and third-century Christianity. These early pagan influences laid the foundation for the practice of saint worship—praying to renowned deceased Christian leaders.Though movements within the Roman Catholic Church attempted to reform this practice, it was not until the Protestant Reformation and Reformers such as John Calvin in Switzerland and the Dissenters of England that it was more forcefully resisted. Though believers must never attribute divine characteristics to those who have lived exemplary Christian lives, the study of their lives may lend remarkable encouragement to succeeding generations of believers.What may be known about Nicholas is often shrouded by fables and folk lure. Throughout the centuries following his death, more and more stories arose about Nicholas that were born out of a desire to create Christian heroes that would tower above the heroes of pagans and other non-Christians. The magical and supernatural deeds commonly credited to Nicholas were often the result of vivid imaginations on the part of admiring Christians who were often attempting to demonstrate the superiority of the Christian faith by displaying the supernatural acts of the most highly esteemed leaders of the faith.From what may be gleaned from the life of Nicholas of Myra (most commonly known as St. Nicholas), contemporary believers may expect to benefit from his example and lingering influence. Along with the Apostle Paul, Augustine, Luther, Wesley and many others, we may list St. Nicholas among that evangelical “great cloud of witnesses” and profit from what may be learned about his ministry.Nicholas was born about 270 in the city of Patara, a seaport city in the province of Lycia in Asia Minor. Today, Asia Minor is known as Turkey and is dominated by Islam. Born at a time when it was illegal to be a Christian, Nicholas’ parents were committed followers of Christ. Nearly half of his life was spent under the Roman Persecution of the Church—a time when Christians were martyred for their faith. In his childhood, Nicholas was taught the Christian Scriptures by his mother and father. Little is known of Nicholas' childhood, but what is known about his father is that he was a man of considerable wealth. Both parents were committed believers, but tragedy struck their small family when an epidemic swept through their town, taking the lives of both parents and orphaning young Nicholas.From his parents, Nicholas inherited his Christian faith and considerable financial fortune, both of which he used to enrich the lives of fellow believers. With his faith in tack, young Nicholas grew to become an ardent follower of Christ and faithful Christian pastor in a town some distance from were he was born. The name of the town were he was chosen as pastor of the Christians living there was Myra, also in modern-day Turkey.Later generations of Christians believed that he wore red clerical attire and in their paintings of what they believed he wore that attributed to him the suits worn by the bishops of their own times rather than the era of Nicholas. Nearly six hundred years would pass following the ministry of Nicholas before church history would record the first use of “the miter and the red cope” by the pope of Roman.On December 6, 343, he passed from this life into the eternal arms of his Lord. He was buried in a small church, but the memory of his ministry did not soon die.Observance: December 7On the quiet Sunday morning of December 7, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy launched a secret attack against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The attack was preemptive and intended to prevent the U.S Pacific Fleet from interfering with the military assaults of the Empire of Japan against the territories of the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the United States in Southeast Asia.The primary attack was conducted by 353 Japanese fighters, bombers, and torpedo planes in two separate waves, launched from six undetected Japanese aircraft carriers. All eight of the U.S. Navy battleships were damaged in the attack, four of which were sunk. In addition, the Japanese also sank or damaged three cruisers, three destroyers, an anti-aircraft training ship, and one minelayer, with 188 U.S. aircraft also being destroyed. Other base installations, such as the power station, headquarters building, shipyard, submarine piers, fuel and torpedo storage facilities, and maintenance buildings were not attacked.As may be expected, American casualties were high, with 2, 402 being killed and 1,282 wounded. Comparatively speaking, Japanese losses were light. While only one Japanese sailor was captured, 29 aircraft and five midget submarines used in the attack were lost, and 65 servicemen were either killed or wounded.The response from the United States was swift. The following day (December 8) America declared war upon Japan. In addition, the attack led directly to the American entrance into World War II in both the Pacific and European theaters of conflict. Prior to the attack upon Pearl Harbor, support for the non-intervention of the United States in the War had been strong, but following the attack such resistance disappeared.So treacherous was the attack by the Japanese on Pearl Harbor, that is led President Franklin D. Roosevelt to declare that December 7, 1941 would be regarded as "a date which will live in infamy."Remembrance: December 11 Congressional Spiritual ProclamationAmong the thousands of documents and events that demonstrate America's Christian origin are the sixteen spiritual proclamations issues by Congress during the American Revolution. Following the pattern of fasting, praying, and offering of thanksgiving to God that was use in the New England Colonies, Congress asked the American states to fast and pray in the spring and offer prayer and thanksgiving in the fall of the year. States were asked to invite their citizens to cease their labors and observe the day as proscribed by Congress.The first of the sixteen spiritual proclamations was issued in late spring on June 7, 1775 and was a fasting and prayer proclamation. The sixteenth and last spiritual proclamation to be issued by Congress on August 3, 1784 was a thanksgiving proclamation.Congress issued one proclamation in the month of December during these years. The spiritual proclamation number, the date it was issued, and the purpose for which it was issued are listed below:Observance: December 17On December 17, 1903, two inventor brothers and aviation pioneers, Orville and Wilbur Wright, piloted the world's first successful manned flying machine at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Although the Wright brothers were not the first to construct and fly experimental aircraft, they were the first to equip their flying machine with controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible. Over the two years that followed the first flight at Kitty Hawk, Orville and Wilbur developed their invention into the first practical fixed-wing airplane.What is often overlooked is the fact that the Wright brothers were the sons of Milton Wright, bishop in the Church of the United Brethren in Christ and natal denomination to the present writer and his wife. In 1889, Bishop Wright led a split in the denomination when a new constitution was proposed by a large portion of the church. The smaller portion of the denomination which he helped to lead, known as the United Brethren in Christ (Old Constitution), eventually established its headquarters in Huntingdon, Indiana. The larger portion of the denomination, known as the United Brethren in Christ (New Constitution), eventually merged with the Methodist Church in 1968 to become the United Methodist Church.Bishop Wright had been stationed at the United Brethren headquarters in Dayton, Ohio, and for this reason, the Wright brothers, yet children, grew out of childhood to live and work in Dayton. Following their initial success as aviators, the Wright name became associated with one of the most important aviation centers in the world. In 1917, Wilbur Wright lent his name and consulting skills to six businessmen who formed the Dayton-Wright Airplane Company, which helped to supply the military with airplanes during World War I. As a result, Dayton became an important center for the production of military aircraft. By the early 1920s, efforts were being made to preserve the development of American and world aviation history in the form of a museum. Today the National Museum of the United States Air Force, the oldest aviation museum in the world, exists as the result of successive efforts to memorialize aviation history. It lies just outside of Dayton, and it does so because a Christian minister was called to serve his denomination as a bishop, laboring at his church's headquarters in Dayton, Ohio.Observance: On or before December 27The life and ministry of the Apostle John, son of Zebedee, is observed annually on December 27 by Christians in the West. John was distinguished as a prophet, an apostle, and an evangelist. He is known as the beloved disciple or "the disciple whom Jesus loved," and was the younger brother of James the Great. The two brothers, and sons of Zebedee, were known as the "sons of thunder." John was previously a disciple of John the Baptist, and after becoming a disciple of Jesus was not only one of the Twelve Apostles, but one of the three members of the inner circle chosen by Jesus from among the Twelve. With these three, Peter, James and John, Christ communicated his teachings more explicitly.Throughout the end of the twentieth and beginning of the twenty-first centuries, Christianity in America has been under a withering attack from secular and non-Christian religious forces. In the 1960s and following, prayer and Bible reading was taken from our public schools. Since this time, public displays of the Christian faith have been consistently and persistently under attack. Gone from public display are the symbols of the Christian faith that guided the birthing and maturing of America.As the courts grant permission to those outside the Christian faith to attack America’s Christian heritage, believers must be more deeply resolved to the visualization of their faith. From the earliest generations of the Church, a rich heritage of symbols has arisen to give expression to the faith of the Christian tradition, symbols which the Church has called "chrismons."Many of America's Founding Fathers read the Bible through each year. For them, the Bible was a means of direction for their personal lives and the life of the nation. Contrary to the popular notion pushed on American that her Founding Fathers were secular, overwhelmingly they were Christians. A study of the Journals of Congress or minutes of Congress reveals that Founding Fathers endorsed the Christian religion and its practices—though no single denomination was endorsed.Few are aware that many of America's Founding Fathers were founders of Bible societies. In fact, Elias Boudinot was a distinguished Founding Father who served as a president of Congress (from Nov. 4, 1782–Nov. 3, 1783), was a member of the American spy network during the Revolution, and held prominent positions in government following the War of Independence. Like many other Founding Fathers, Boudinot promoted Bible societies and served as the first president of the American Bible Society. He was followed in that office by John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.The idea that the people of a nation were the primary foundation of government is known as "republicanism," and Founding Fathers such as Noah Webster understood that the Bible provided the foundation for republicanism:The brief exposition of the constitution of the United States, will unfold to young persons the principles of republican government; and it is the sincere desire of the writer that our citizens should early understand that the genuine source of correct republican principles is the Bible, particularly the New Testament or the Christian religion.As the new year begins, Christians should give careful consideration to designated personal times of prayer and Bible reading. To assist in the matter of prayer and Bible reading, suggested resources are offered below:Some additional dates of significance include the following:December 12, 1847: James Kent (July 31, 1763 – December 12, 1847) was an American jurist and legal scholar. He has been long remembered for his Commentaries on American Law (four volumes, published 1826-1830), highly respected in England and America. The Commentaries treated both state, federal and international law, and the law of personal rights and of property, and went through six editions in Kent's lifetime. With Joseph Story, he is remembered as the Father of American Jurisprudence.December 15, 1791: The First Amendment (along with the rest of the Bill of Rights) was submitted to the states for ratification on September 25, 1789 and adopted on December 15, 1791.December 16, 1773, Boston Tea Party. After officials in Boston refused to return three shiploads of taxed tea to Britain, a group of colonists boarded the ships and destroyed the tea by throwing it into Boston Harbor.December 22, 1984: Audrey Wetherell Johnson founder of Bible Study Fellowship (also known as BSF) is an international Christian interdenominational or parachurch fellowship of lay people offering a system of structured bible study. Johnson, who had been a British evangelist to China, started Bible Study Fellowship in 1959.December 23, 1915: William Howard Doane (born in Preston, Connecticut on February 3, 1832; died in South Orange, New Jersey on December 23, 1915) was an industrialist who composed Christian hymn tunes. He held patents on wood-working machinery and in 1861 became President of J. A. Fay and Company. In religious work he headed the Ohio Baptist Convention Ministers Aid Society for the Midwest. In 1875 he received his doctorate in music from Denison University. In his musical career he edited forty-three collections of hymns and composed hundreds of hymns. He composed the music to several hymns by Fanny Crosby.December 25, 1918: John Wilbur Chapman (June 17, 1859, Richmond, Indiana – December 25, 1918, New York, New York) was a Presbyterian evangelist in the late 19th Century, generally traveling with gospel singer Charles Alexander. His parents were Alexander H. and Lorinda (McWhinney) Chapman.December 29, 1876: Philip Paul Bliss (9 July 1838 – 29 December 1876) was an American composer, conductor, writer of hymns and a bass-baritone Gospel singer. He wrote many well-known hymns, including Almost Persuaded, Hallelujah, What a Savior!, Let the Lower Lights Be Burning, Wonderful Words of Life, and the tune for Horatio Spafford's, It Is Well with My Soul.December 29, 1903: Thomas Bramwell Welch (December 31, 1825 – December 29, 1903) was the inventor of the pasteurization process to prevent the fermentation of grape juice.December 31: Watch-night service. See our article on the influence of this service upon the life of America during the Revolution in our article, Watch-night Service: From Ale-house to Revolution.The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States with an Appendix Containing Important State Papers and Public Documents and All the Laws of a Public Nature (Washington : Gales and Seaton, 1855), 797. See John Woodbridge, More Than Conquerors: Portraits of Believers from All Walks of Life. Noah Webster, History of the United States to Which Is Prefixed a Brief Historical Account of Our English Ancestors (New Haven, CT: Durrie & Peck, 1832), 6.Christian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Living in DecemberChristian Heritage Fellowship FacebookChristian Heritage Fellowship FacebookChristian Heritage Fellowship Facebook

Often, the Christmas season is the most meaningful time of year—for both the believer and unbeliever. Many fail to use this season of the year to point to Christ as fully as they might to Christianize

Christian Living in November

The holidays of America and most of Western civilization are the result of Christian influence and origin. As some of the most important holidays in America and throughout the world are celebrated at the end of the year, it is appropriate to rehearse the significance of their Christian beginnings. While secularists, atheists, agnostics, "free thinkers," and other forms of irreligion attempt to rob Christians of the heritage they have given to the world, followers of Christ must be more deeply resolved not to allow this group of antagonists to bully Christians and the world into submission.As the calendar year draws to an end, many opportunities for meaningful Christian celebration should not be overlooked. In America, Christians should make every effort to capitalize on the Christian heritage bequeathed to the nation by our forefathers—especially Christian Heritage Week, Bible Sunday, Thanksgiving, and Christmas, not to mention lesser-known observances. Important historical and spiritual events should not be permitted to lapse without being duly noted an observed by Christians—whether in the home, business, or local congregation. Contents In addition to the highlights of this month that are discussed below, additional subjects of interest regarding our Christian heritage are presented online, where they are arranged according to dates of occurrence—with particular attention being given to the influence Christianity has exercised upon the origin of America. The online calendar where these articles are arranged is under continual development with new articles appearing as they become available. By clicking the message box below, readers will navigate to the present month under consideration. The last four months of our year, September, October, November and December, all receive their names from Latin numerical terms. Prior to the introduction of January and February into our calendar system, the old Roman calendar employed a calendar of only ten months. Latin numbers were given to these months: septem, (meaning seven) became September; octem, (meaning eight) became October; novem (meaning nine) became November; decem (meaning ten) became December. When January and February were added to the ten-month calendar to become our twelve-month calendar, these latter four months retained their Latin names.In the Julian and Gregorian Calendars, November is the eleventh month of the year. November in the Northern Hemisphere is one of the months of autumn, but in the Southern Hemisphere it is the seasonal equivalent of May in the Northern Hemisphere and vice versa.The official birth flowers of November are the chrysanthemum and peony. The chrysanthemum were first cultivated in China during the 15th century BC as a flowering herb and reached the Western world during the 17th century. Today, it is estimated that more than 20,000 varieties of chrysanthemums exist and because of their popularity are known as the “Queen of Fall Flowers”. They are believed to symbolize friendship and convey well-wishes.Observance: Prior to Election DayWhile the overwhelming majority of Americans are not pastors or church leaders, all Christians should be aware of the active role pastors played in early America to bring about the birth of the nation. America was founded on Christian biblical principles, but for many years, denominational leaders have failed to encourage the clergy and local churches to speak out on political issues. Fear of reprisal from the IRS has enslaved many denominational leaders to the notion that Christians should not speak out concerning the political direction of the nation. But early American ecclesiastical leaders were not timid about proclaiming the fact that Scripture teaches that the reign of Christ should be extended to the entire world, including politics.Pastors are encouraged to invited local politicians to an Election-Day Service to remind them of their duties under God and their responsibility to the Christian legal foundation of America. King George III reigned over the British Empire at the time of the American Revolution. He realized what Americans have forgotten. King George called the Revolution in America a "Black-robe Rebellion" because many pastors wore black clerical attire into their pulpits and preached that if the King and the English Parliament would not abide by the Law of God, the citizens had a right to throw off the yoke of tyranny. Pastors laid the theological foundation for the greatest nation in the history of the world, and if America is to remain great, pastors and church leaders will have to take a stand as courageous as our spiritual forefathers.The first Tuesday in November is "Election Day." Below are some valuable resources for Christians and church leaders with regard to this important opportunity to help Christianize our nation:American Family Association: Christian Coalition: Eagle Forum: Million Voices: WallBuilders: and Remembrance: Congressional Spiritual Proclamations in MarchAmong the thousands of documents and events that demonstrate America's Christian origin are the sixteen spiritual proclamations issues by Congress during the American Revolution. Following the pattern of fasting, praying, and offering of thanksgiving to God that was use in the New England Colonies, Congress asked the American states to fast and pray in the spring and offer prayer and thanksgiving in the fall of the year. States were asked to invite their citizens to cease their labors and observe the day as proscribed by Congress.The first of the sixteen spiritual proclamations was issued in late spring on June 7, 1775 and was a fasting and prayer proclamation. The sixteenth and last spiritual proclamation to be issued by Congress on August 3, 1784 was a thanksgiving proclamation.Congress issued two proclamations in the month of November during these years. The spiritual proclamation numbers, the dates they were issued, and the purpose for which they were issued are listed below:Proclamation #4 – November 1, 1777: ThanksgivingProclamation #6 – November 16, 1778: ThanksgivingObservance: On or prior to November 11In the United States, Veterans' Day is usually observed on November 11. If this date occurs on a Sunday, usually the following Monday is employed as the day of observance. If the eleventh should fall on a Saturday, it may be observed that day or the beginning of the following week.One of America's most decorated veterans was Sgt. Alvin York of Pall Mall, Tennessee. He was a deeply committed Christian who sought to live a sanctified Christian life as a member of the Churches of Christ in Christian Union (Circleville, Ohio). He was America's most highly decorated veteran of World War I.Observance: Sunday before to Saturday after ThanksgivingNational Bible Week begins the Sunday before Thanksgiving. That Sunday is designated as Bible Sunday. Because Bible Sunday immediately precedes Thanksgiving, it generally receives little if any attention. Therefore, it is suggested that pastors and local churches observe Bible Sunday one Sunday earlier to call attention to Bible week and yet make allowance for attention to be given to Thanksgiving the Sunday before Thanksgiving. Observing Bible Sunday one week earlier will also allow pastors sufficient opportunity to celebrate Thanksgiving the Sunday before this important holiday.One of the most influential organizations used of the Lord to distribute Bibles around the world has been The Gideons International. Gideons are laymen and women who give sacrificially of themselves and their personal resources to advance the kingdom of Christ. It is safe to make the generalization that no other Bible-distributing organization contributes as much to the local churches throughout America and many parts of the world as does The Gideons International. Usually, local camps or organized groups of Gideons have speakers available to speak at local churches. In many cases, arrangements may be made with local Gideons for one of their speakers to address a congregation, speaking for a small portion or the entire speaking-portion of the service. A love offering will be deeply appreciated and used wisely to continue to place Bibles in hotels, hospitals, and other places where souls are in need of Jesus Christ. Please help the Gideons today!Observance: Week of ThanksgivingOn August 11, 1992, U. S. Representative for West Virginia's third congressional district, Mr. Nick Joe Rahall II, rose to address his colleagues with an important request:Mr. Speaker, I rise today to introduce a House joint resolution calling for the designation of Thanksgiving week as "America's Christian Heritage Week." This year, the proclamation would cover the week of November 22 through November 28. It proclaims that America does, indeed, have a Christian heritage.This Democratic Representative went on to lament the repression of the Christian Faith in the nation it had birthed, but through his efforts, Congress placed its stamp of approval upon Mr. Rahall's motion. For his sincere efforts, Representative Rahall is to be highly commended.Tragically, Christians throughout America have failed to capitalize on what Congress did in 1992. Denominational leaders have failed to move the interests of Christ forward even on those very rare occasions when Congress hands them a gift such as this. For more than twenty years, this opportunity has lacked wide-scale support from Christians. It is no wonder that liberal main-line denominations have treated it with disdain, but it is inexcusable that Bible-believing denominations have failed to arm their members with the resources necessary to help stem the tide of spiritual and moral decay in our nation. Until Christian leaders begin to focus on the work to which Christ has called them, and not merely their own parochial passions, the Church in America will continue its decline.God give us leaders who will undertake the cause of Jesus Christ!Christians must become involved in the opportunity to remind the nation of our Christian heritage. Mr. Bruce Barilla has maintained a website encouraging pastors and the laity to become involved in this effort. Educational, political, and ecclesiastical leaders in every sphere of responsibility should be encouraged to participate. You may find Mr. Barilla at and other resources by searching the web. At the request of Christian Heritage Fellowship (2012), Mr. Barilla wrote to encourage Christians to become involved in this important opportunity:I encourage ministers, preachers, pastors/elders alike to participate in celebrating America's Christian Heritage Week at the local, state and national level with relevant Sunday school lessons, sermons, reading of proclamations, youth programs, patriotic song services and prayer meetings. Commemorating America's Christian heritage provides an opportunity for those choosing to participate to thank God for His 'Blessings of Liberty,' to ask His help to 'insure domestic Tranquility' and to recognize our national need and 'unalienable Rights' in reaffirming our 'reliance on the Protection of Divine Providence' for keeping our families secure, communities safe and America a 'Free and Independent' 'one Nation, under God.' As President Woodrow Wilson stated, "A nation which does not remember what it was yesterday, does not know what it is today, nor what it is trying to do. We are trying to do a futile thing if we do not know where we came from or what we have been about...."Observance: First or second Sunday of NovemberThe International Day of Prayer for the Persecuted Church is held in early November. In Western Christianity, the lives of Christians who have departed this world have been remembered in early November through "All Saints Day" and "All Souls Day." It is fitting that the modern Church set aside early November as a time to remember and pray for fellow believers who are being persecuted around the world. Many Christians support this effort through the International Day of Prayer for the Persecuted Church (IDOP). Riding upon the shoulders of Darwinism, irreligious and secular governments around the world seek increasingly to flex their tyrannical muscles. Secular irreligious governments, unfettered by divine law, always establish man's hateful, intolerant laws. The twentieth century alone clearly demonstrates how irreligious Darwinian governments have slaughtered millions around the world. Because America's Founding Fathers believed human rights originate with God, it is not possible to be a Darwinist or Marxist and be a true American. Observance: Fourth Thursday of NovemberIn America, the Thanksgiving tradition is commonly traced to 1621, the year after the Pilgrim Fathers arrived in the New World. After arriving in present-day Massachusetts, the Pilgrims experienced an extremely difficult first winter in their new home. With the assistance of the Wampanoag Natives Indians, the Pilgrims enjoyed a bountiful harvest in 1621, and to celebrate God's goodness, the Pilgrims joined with Natives to celebrate. Though an annual Thanksgiving feast was not observed until the 1660s, subsequent Thanksgivings to 1621 were observed. In addition to feasts, the Pilgrims and Puritans, who followed to the New World, also observed seasons of fasting. This latter practice was used by civil leaders in the American Colonies for many years. President George Washington issued the First Presidential Thanksgiving Proclamation on October 3, 1789, establishing November 26, 1789 as a day of thanksgiving and prayer to "Almighty God" for His providential care of our fledgling nation.Observance: On or before November 30The Apostle Andrew, the brother of St. Peter, carried the Gospel to many Asiatic nations, beginning his missionary endeavors in the Provinces of Vithynia and Pontus on the southern shores of the Black Sea. It is believed that he subsequently traveled to the City of Byzantium where he established a church.In one of his missionary tours to Achaia (Greece), Andrew visited the city of Patras where his preaching and miracles drew many to Christ, including Maximilla, the wife of the Roman Proconsul, Aegeates. The Proconsul's own brother, Stratoklis, followed the example of his sister-in-law, Maximilla, and became a Christian as well. Andrew, realizing the sincerity of his faith consecrated Stratoklis to the office of Bishop of Patras. What followed this experience resulted in Andrew's martyrdom.Our suggested resources for the month of October address several subjects of importance. In addition to suggested timely reading materials, our occasional Heritage Hallmarks remind our readers of significant moments in the life of the Christian Church and American life. They are designed to reflect upon the remarkable heritage bequeathed to America and the world by the Christian Faith and seek to visualize important moments in history. Secular influence has removed important monuments of Christian influence, but our Heritage Hallmarks allow parents and grandparents the opportunity to remind succeeding generations of the glorious heritage of Christianity. For a list of additional materials available at our site, please click the following link: Our Resources.To speak intelligently to a believing and unbelieving world, Christians must not only be able to defend the truth associated with the lives of the virtuous, but must also be prepared to expose the facts concerning the villainous. For this reason, individuals and events that are both beneficial and malignant are noted below. Knowledge of the virtuous provides insight into how the believer should live, while examples of the villainous prepare believers to "give an answer" to every individual of how life should not be lived (1 Peter 3:15).November 1772: Samuel Adams initiated the formation of the Committees of Correspondence that was so vital to the development of American interests prior to and during the Revolutionary War. See our article: November 11, 1620: After more than two months at sea, the Pilgrims arrived at Cape Cod. November 14, 1915: Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 - November 14, 1915) was an African-American educator, author, orator, and advisor to presidents of the United States. Between 1890 and 1915, Washington was the dominant leader in the African-American community. For more information concerning his influence upon American education, see David Barton, Four Centuries of American Education, 41.November 15, 1794: John Knox Witherspoon (February 5, 1723 - November 15, 1794) was a Scots Presbyterian minister and a signatory of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New Jersey. As president of the College of New Jersey (1768-94; now Princeton University), he trained many leaders of the early nation and was the only active clergyman and the only college president to sign the Declaration.November 22, 1963: Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 - 22 November 1963), commonly called C. S. Lewis and known to his friends and family as "Jack", was a novelist, poet, academic, medievalist, literary critic, essayist, lay theologian, and Christian apologist. Born in Belfast, Ireland, he held academic positions at both Oxford University (Magdalen College), 1925-1954, and Cambridge University (Magdalene College), 1954-1963. November 25, 1748: Isaac Watts (17 July 1674 - 25 November 1748) was an English hymnwriter, theologian and logician. A prolific and popular hymnwriter, he was recognized as the "Father of English Hymnody", credited with some 750 hymns. Many of his hymns remain in use today, and have been translated into many languages.November 30, 1864: The Battle of Franklin, TN was waged between Union and Confederate forces on this date. Confederate chaplain Edward McKendree Bounds was engaged in the conflict and taken captive. E. M. Bounds is widely known for his writings on prayer. Though Dr. Schmidt's interest focuses upon the commercialization of American holidays, his book still reflects the Christian influence of American holidays: Leigh Eric Schmidt, Consumer Rites: The Buying and Selling of American Holidays (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995). Usually this is observed the first or second Sundays of November and dates of observance vary among organizations supporting this effort. See and . Bradford, Plymouth Settlement, 64. See John Woodbridge, More Than Conquerors: Portraits of Believers from All Walks of Life.Christian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Living in NovemberChristian Heritage Fellowship FacebookChristian Heritage Fellowship FacebookChristian Heritage Fellowship Facebook

The holidays of America and most of Western civilization are the result of Christian influence and origin. As some of the most important holidays in America and throughout the world are celebrated at

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