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Methodist Churches

The study of the history of Methodism will result in the awareness that many denominations are related historically and theologically as spiritual descendants of John Wesley. Some denominations, though not related to Methodism from the point of their origins, are related theologically that is they are Arminian or Wesleyan-Arminian. Though some smaller groups or denominations may not be identified in the list below, what follows is an overview of the major descendants of the Methodist tradition in America.

American Descendants of Methodism

Year:
Event:
1729
John Wesley and the birth of British Wesleyan Methodism (1795)
1784
The Methodist Episcopal Church
1792
Republican Methodists (the O’Kelly movement, later uniting with the Congregational Church)
1800
Church of the United Brethren in Christ (later the E.U.B.)
1803
The Evangelical Church (became the Evangelical Association in 1816, and in 1946 the Evangelical United Brethren)
1805
The Union African Methodist Episcopal Church
1814
Reformed Methodist Church (anti-episcopal)
1816
African Methodist Episcopal Church
1821
African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church
1829
Primitive Methodist Church, U.S.A. (from the British “camp meeting” Methodists)
1830
Methodist Protestant Church (lay representation; reentered the Methodist Church in 1939)
1843
Wesleyan Methodist Connection of America (abolitionist and anti-episcopal)
1844
Methodist Episcopal Church, South (result of the North/South struggle; reentered the Methodist Church in 1939)
1850
Union American Methodist Episcopal Church
1852
Congregational Methodist Church
1860
Free Methodist Church of North America (abolitionist, free pews)
1864
United Christian Church (withdrawing from the United Brethren in Christ)
1867:
National Camp Meeting Association for the Promotion of Holiness (NCAPH–emerging from various camp meeting associations; later the Christian Holiness Association)
1869
Reformed Zion Union Apostolic Church
1870
Colored Methodist Episcopal Church (later the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church)
1880
Salvation Army (founded in London, 1865)
1880
Church of God (Anderson, Ind). Through Daniel S. Warner, the founder of the Church of God, classical Anabaptist beliefs were introduced into the holiness movement at an early stage in its institutional development.
1880
The Holiness Church
1885
Reformed Methodist Union Episcopal Church (withdrawing from the A.M.E. Church)
1886
The Church of God (Cleveland, Tenn)
1889
United Brethren in Christ (Old Constitution; stemming from the United Brethren)
1890
The Fire- Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan)
1894
United Evangelical Church (perfectionists withdrawing from the Evangelical Association)
1890-95
Pentecostal Holiness Church, International
1897
Pilgrim Holiness Church
1898
The Pentecostal Alliance (later united with the Church of the Nazarene)
1900
The Apostolic Faith Mission
1901
Pillar of fire (withdrawing from the Methodist Church)
1903
The Church of God (Huntsville, Ala.)
1903
The Church of God of Prophecy
1906
Independent Assemblies of God, International
1906
The Church of God in Christ
1907
International Pentecostal Assemblies
1907
The Apostolic Faith
1908
The Church of the Nazarene
1924
Assemblies of God
1917
Pentecostal Church of Christ (later united with the International Pentecostal Assemblies to form the International Pentecostal Church of Christ)
1918
Pentecostal Fire-Baptized Holiness Church
1920
Holiness Church of God, Inc
1939
The Methodist Church (a unification of the Methodist Episcopal Church; the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; and the Methodist Protestant Church)
1939
Southern Methodist Church (declined unification with the Methodist Church)
1942
Fundamental Methodist Church, Inc
1946
Evangelical United Brethren (a unification of the church of the United Brethren in Christ and the Evangelical Church)
1959
Wesleyan Holiness Association of Churches
1968
The Wesleyan Church (a unification of the Pilgrim Holiness Church and the Wesleyan Methodist Church of America)
1968
Evangelical Church of North America (a unification of some congregations of the Evangelical United Brethren, with the Holiness Methodist Church)
1969
Missionary Church (a unification of the Missionary Church Association and the United Missionary Church)[1]

This concludes another episode from our podcast library, entitled, Methodist Churches .

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[1] See Thomas C. Oden, Doctrinal Standards in the Wesleyan Tradition (Grand Rapids: Francis Asbury Press of Zondervan Publishing House, 1988), 129-31.

Written by Dr. Stephen FlickNumber of posts: 220
Concerned with the cultural decay of America, Dr. Flick has sought to provide answers to fellow Christians (and unbelievers) concerning the questions and objections to Christianity often posed by secularists and the irreligious. Dr. Flick is Christian Heritage Fellowship’s executive director and resides in East Tennessee with his wife, Beth. He spent 12 years as a Seminary professor and has been a licensed minister for more than thirty years, during which time he has served as pastor, revival and camp meeting evangelist, interim pastor, and other ministerial roles. He has authored numerous articles concerning America’s Christian heritage. Dr. Flick earned his Ph.D. from Drew University in theology and church history.

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